Launches and relaunches in Ireland and South Africa

A series of book launches and workshops was held over November, and there are plans to organise something similar in the new year, but in evenings when more people will find it possible to attend. It is also planned to join in with Ireland in the writing contest for schoolchildren, with a view to the winning stories being accumulated in a published book.

This report appeared in Bookseeker Literary Agency Blog:

By now you’re all well aware that P’kaboo Publishers has relocated from South Africa to Ireland, and is gearing up for big things. Amongst them is a writing contest for children between the ages of 8 and 18. So if you’re a young person living in Ireland, or you know someone who is, then take note and watch this space… because we’re watching their web site, and as soon as the rules are published we’ll let you know.
We do already know that amongst the prizes will be getting a story published in a book, along with all the other winning stories. And there will be a wonderful launch party in Cobh, Co. Cork.
Meanwhile, Pkaboo has retained an associate back in South Africa. Professional editor Les Noble, whom many of our clients have used, has taken over marketing and promoting their books in their ‘old country’, added to which he has started his own imprint – Noblest Publications. As you can see from the handbill below, he has planned a series of events in the city of Durban, including one that re-introduces Carmen Capuano’s excellent novel Split Decision.
poster-for-november-2018-launches

20 thoughts on “Launches and relaunches in Ireland and South Africa

  1. LordBeariOfBow

    Professional editor Les Noble, whom many of our clients have used, has taken over marketing and promoting their ,,,,,,,
    I’ve noticed that the word ‘whom’ gets used most of the time these days, doesn’t sound right to me
    Professional editor Les Noble, who many of our clients have used, has taken over marketing and promoting their ……… seems to sound right and better, Am I bonkers?

    Which is correct?
    I’m not fond of the whom, sounds archaic to me

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    1. colonialist Post author

      Of course, as the editor in question, but not the writer of that passage — who is an agent rather than an editor — I must respond.
      The simple rule is that ‘who’ is used when ‘he’ is implied, and ‘whom’ when ‘him’ is. The first would be a subject, and the other a direct or indirect object.
      The case in point: ‘ . . . many of our clients have used . . .’ (he or him?) Him, so ‘whom’ Is correct.

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      Reply
  2. LordBeariOfBow

    The way I saw it neither he or him was implied.
    It starts/states Professional editor Les Noble, so nothing is implied. it’s a stated fact.
    This is the trouble being an autodidactic, we get a mindset 😦

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    1. colonialist Post author

      Actually, in a sentence like that either ‘he’ or ‘him’ HAS to be implied. The ‘who’ or ‘whom’ is simply replacing: ‘… many of our clients have used HE…’ or ‘… many of our clients have used HIM . . .’ One can tell instantly which one sounds right there, Answer ‘HIM’, so ‘WHOM’.
      Consider: ‘… editor Les Noble,WHO is used by many of our clients …’ Again, ‘HE is used by many…’ or ‘HIM is used by many’? ‘HE’, so ‘WHO’.

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      1. LordBeariOfBow

        Well I must admit that I agree there, used that many times when I was much, much younger.
        Do some really say that? Even an ignorant Cockney like me, knows that’s wrong. we know it should be ‘ ‘Me was sat by the table” . 😈 😀 😛

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    1. colonialist Post author

      No, I am still based in Durban, from where I have taken over the South African side of P’kaboo and Honeymead. The support base in publishing and printing is very good here. The owner/co-creator of these two publishing companies emigrated to Ireland with her children after the tragic murder of her husband.
      I have also formed my own publishing company, Noblest Publications, as a basis for the amazing (but controversial) ‘The Goddess of the Devil’ by Estonian genius Mart Sander.

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